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Everyday Spices

Everyday Spices

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Garlic Powder

Garlic powder is ground, dehydrated garlic. It is a very common seasoning. Applications include pasta, pizza, ranch dressing and grilled chicken. Garlic salt is simply salt plus garlic powder. Garlic powder is a common component of spice mix. Any dish with ground beef, meatballs, meatloaf, chili, hamburgers is a great candidate for garlic powder. Sprinkle it in. Its fine texture makes sure the garlic flavor is evenly distributed throughout the dish.

Our Price: $4.95
Onion Powder

Onion powder is dehydrated, ground onion that is commonly used as a seasoning. It is a common ingredient in seasoned salt and spice mixes, such as beau monde seasoning. Some varieties are prepared using toasted onion. White, yellow and red onions may be used. Onion powder may be used as a seasoning atop a variety of foods and dishes, such as pasta, pizza, and grilled chicken. Onion powder is also an ingredient in some commercially prepared foods, such as sauces, soups, and salad dressings. It can also be used in many other recipes such as burgers or meatloaf. White, yellow and red onions may be used.

Our Price: $4.95
White Pepper

White pepper consists solely of the seed of the ripe fruit of the pepper plant, with the thin darker-coloured skin (flesh) of the fruit removed. This is usually accomplished by a process known as retting, where fully ripe red pepper berries are soaked in water for about a week so the flesh of the peppercorn softens and decomposes; rubbing then removes what remains of the fruit, and the naked seed is dried. Ground white pepper is used commonly in Chinese, Thai and Portuguese cuisine, but also in salads, light-coloured sauces, and mashed potatoes as a substitute, because black pepper would visibly stand out. However, white pepper lacks certain compounds present in the outer layer of the drupe, resulting in a different overall flavor. White, yellow and red onions may be used.

Our Price: $4.95
Stock Info: 12 In Stock
Sea Salt

Sea salt is salt that is produced by the evaporation of seawater. It is used as a seasoning in foods, cooking, cosmetics and for preserving food. Like mined rock salt, production of sea salt has been dated to prehistoric times. There is no scientific evidence that consuming sea salt instead of more refined sodium chloride salts has any health benefit. The dilute brine of the sea was largely evaporated by the sun. In Roman areas, this was done using ceramic containers known as briquetage. Workers scraped up the concentrated salt and mud slurry and washed it with clean sea water to settle impurities out of the now concentrated brine. They poured the brine into shallow pans (lightly baked from local marine clay) and set them on fist-sized clay pillars over a peat fire for final evaporation. Then they scraped out the dried salt and sold it. Raking salt depicted on a 1938 British postage stamp

Our Price: $3.95
Ground Yellow Mustard

Add a distinct, sharp flavor to traditional dishes with Regal ground yellow mustard. Derived from mustard plants, these seeds have been ground to a fine powder to produce a pungent and zesty spice. Great for making your own mustard condiments, this powder is capable of producing a spicier variety of mustard than standard store-bought yellow mustard. Yellow mustard also serves as a vital component to pickling and shrimp and crab boil blends.

Our Price: $4.95
Ground Coriander

Coriander is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. It is also known as Chinese parsley, and in the United States the stems and leaves are usually called cilantro. All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most traditionally used in cooking. Most people perceive the taste of coriander leaves as a tart, lemon/lime taste, but a smaller group of about 3Ã21% of people tested think the leaves taste like dish soap, linked to a gene which detects some specific aldehydes that are also used as odorant substances in many soaps and detergents Coriander is native to regions spanning from Southern Europe and Northern Africa to Southwestern Asia. It is a soft plant growing to 50 cm (20 in) tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems. The flowers are borne in small umbels, white or very pale pink, asymmetrical, with the petals pointing away from the center of the umbel longer (5Ã6 mm or 0.20Ã0.24 in) than those pointing toward it (only 1Ã3 mm or 0.039Ã0.118 in long). The fruit is a globular, dry schizocarp 3Ã5 mm (0.12Ã0.20 in) in diameter. Pollen size is approximately 33 microns.

Our Price: $4.95
Stock Info: 12 In Stock
Ground Cumin

This unique spice is derived from the dried, ground seed of the Cuminum plant, a member of the parsley family. Cumin is characterized by a distinctive, slightly bitter taste and a smokiness which leaves behind a slight heat. The bitter, zesty flavor of cumin enhances the taste of meats, soups, and stews, and adds a bit of warmth to curries, chili, salsa, and couscous. Cumin is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to southwestern Asia including the Middle East. Its seeds à each one contained within a fruit, which is dried à are used in the cuisines of many cultures in both whole and ground form. Likely originating in a region of the Eastern Mediterranean called the Levant, cumin has been in use as a spice for thousands of years. Seeds excavated at the Syrian site Tell ed-Der were dated to the second millennium BC. They have also been reported from several New Kingdom levels of ancient Egyptian archaeological sites. In the ancient Egyptian civilization, cumin was used as a spice and as a preservative in mummification. Cumin was a significant spice for the Minoans in ancient Crete. Ideograms for cumin appear in Linear A archive tablets documenting Minoan palace stores during the Late Minoan period. The ancient Greeks kept cumin at the dining table in its own container (much as pepper is frequently kept today), and this practice continues in Morocco. Cumin was also used heavily in ancient Roman cuisine. In India, it has been used for millennia as a traditional ingredient in innumerable recipes, and forms the basis of many other spice blends.

Our Price: $4.29
Stock Info: 12 In Stock
Tarragon Leaves

Tarragon, also known as estragon, is a species of perennial herb in the sunflower family. It is widespread in the wild across much of Eurasia and North America, and is cultivated for culinary and medicinal purposes. French tarragon is the variety used for cooking in the kitchen[9] and is not grown from seed, as the flowers are sterile; instead it is propagated by root division. Russian tarragon (A. dracunculoides L.) can be grown from seed but is much weaker in flavor when compared to the French variety. However, Russian tarragon is a far more hardy and vigorous plant, spreading at the roots and growing over a meter tall. This tarragon actually prefers poor soils and happily tolerates drought and neglect. It is not as strongly aromatic and flavorsome as its French cousin, but it produces many more leaves from early spring onwards that are mild and good in salads and cooked food. Russian tarragon loses what flavor it has as it ages and is widely considered useless as a culinary herb, though it is sometimes used in crafts. The young stems in early spring can be cooked as an asparagus substitute. Horticulturists recommend that Russian tarragon be grown indoors from seed and planted out in the summer. The spreading plants can be divided easily. A better substitute for French tarragon is Spanish tarragon (Tagetes lucida), also known as Mexican mint marigold, Mexican tarragon, Texas tarragon, or winter tarragon. It is much more reminiscent of French tarragon, with a hint of anise. Although not in the same genus as the other tarragons, Spanish tarragon has a stronger flavor than Russian tarragon that does not diminish significantly with age.

Our Price: $4.95
Stock Info: 12 In Stock
Dill Weed

Dill is an annual herb in the celery family Apiaceae. It is the only species in the genus Anethum. Dill is grown widely in Eurasia where its leaves and seeds are used as a herb or spice for flavoring food. When paired with yogurt or sour cream, dill weed can be used to make a variety of delicious dips. It is also the perfect garnish for vegetable dips or other hors o'doeuvres. Fresh and dried dill leaves (sometimes called "dill weed" to distinguish it from dill seed) are widely used as herbs in Europe and central Asia. Like caraway, the fernlike leaves of dill are aromatic and are used to flavor many foods such as gravlax (cured salmon) and other fish dishes, borscht, and other soups, as well as pickles (where the dill flower is sometimes used). Dill is best when used fresh, as it loses its flavor rapidly if dried, however, freeze-dried dill leaves retain their flavor relatively well for a few months. Dill oil is extracted from the leaves, stems, and seeds of the plant. The oil from the seeds is distilled and used in the manufacturing of soaps. Dill is the eponymous ingredient in dill pickles.

Our Price: $4.29
Stock Info: 12 In Stock

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